Postcard dating by stamp

Initially, the United States government prohibited private companies from calling their cards "postcards", so they were known as "souvenir cards".

These cards had to be labeled "Private Mailing Cards".

Conlie was a training camp for soldiers in the Franco-Prussian war. Cards showing images increased in number during the 1880s.

The cards had a lithographed design printed on them containing emblematic images of piles of armaments on either side of a scroll topped by the arms of the Duchy of Brittany and the inscription "War of 1870. Images of the newly built Eiffel Tower in 18 gave impetus to the postcard, leading to the so-called "golden age" of the picture postcard in years following the mid-1890s.

Charlton of Philadelphia, who patented a postal card, and sold the rights to Hymen Lipman, whose postcards, complete with a decorated border, were labeled "Lipman's postal card". In Britain, postcards without images were issued by the Post Office in 1870, and were printed with a stamp as part of the design, which was included in the price of purchase. The larger size was found to be slightly too large for ease of handling, and was soon withdrawn in favour of cards 13mm (½ inch) shorter.

The first known printed picture postcard, with an image on one side, was created in France in 1870 at Camp Conlie by Léon Besnardeau (1829–1914). The first advertising card appeared in 1872 in Great Britain and the first German card appeared in 1874.

The reverse of the card is smooth, like earlier postcards.

The rag content in the card stock allowed a much more colorful and vibrant image to be printed than the earlier "white border" style.

These were commonly known as French postcards, due to the large number of them produced in France.

This was known as the "undivided back" era of postcards.

From March 1, 1907 the Post Office allowed private citizens to write on the address side of a postcard.

Despite the name, linen postcards were not produced on a linen fabric, but used newer printing processes that used an inexpensive card stock with a high rag content, and were then finished with a pattern which resembled linen.

The face of the cards is distinguished by a textured cloth appearance which makes them easily recognizable.

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