Teen dating scrary move effects

In my dozens of conversations with teens, parents, clinicians and school counselors across the country, there was a pervasive sense that being a teenager today is a draining full-time job that includes doing schoolwork, managing a social-media identity and fretting about career, climate change, sexism, racism--you name it.

It's a phenomenon that cuts across all demographics--suburban, urban and rural; those who are college bound and those who aren't.

Family financial stress can exacerbate these issues, and studies show that girls are more at risk than boys.

In 2015, about 3 million teens ages 12 to 17 had had at least one major depressive episode in the past year, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

It would be three years before Faith-Ann, now 20 and a film student in Los Angeles, told her parents about the depth of her distress.

She hid the marks on her torso and arms, and hid the sadness she couldn't explain and didn't feel was justified. She loved her parents and knew they'd be supportive if she asked for help.

Leave a Reply